9-11
aloneness
assassination
astrology_reports
big_pharma
breath
cancer_cures
cannabis_cures
commerce_game
constitution
death
dental_health
drones
foods_for_health
garden
gmo_monsanto
gun_control
gun_rights
health_teachers
herbal_remedies

maillist146




babar's_11s


EMF-Physical





And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him; and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts: gold, frankincense & myrrh.” - Matthew 2:11

Essential Oils

5% discount on all prices when payment is received in gold or silver coins. Click here to order. Shipping within the U.S. is FREE on any order of at least $65, and included with every essential oil order are several pdf ebooks on how to best use them. Please inquire about availability of smaller bottle sizes and prices on the more expensive oils.
Essential Oil Kit and List of all Oils on the left; Precautions; News & Articles

Past cultures valued few substances above nature’s essential oils. For at least the last 6,000 years, they have been used not only for their scents and as beauty care products, but also for their medicinal and curative properties. Those who are wise to essential oils have always considered them sacred. According to the translation of ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphics and Chinese Manuscripts, priests and physicians were using essential oils thousands of years before the time of Christ. They are mankind's first medicine. There are 188 references to essential oils in the Bible. When the pharaoh Tutankhamun’s tomb was opened in 1922, the air was permeated with their aroma.

Essential oils were very highly esteemed trade items and at places and times were even used as money. Our modern society is just beginning to catch on to them. Like gold & silver, they are real; not like pieces of paper that only represent something else.

Very few of the world’s plants produce essential oils - there are less than a couple hundred aromatic essences that can be extracted from the flowers, trees, fruits, bark, grasses and/or seeds from various plants, and all of these oils have distinctive therapeutic, psychological and physiological properties that improve health and prevent illness.

bottles All 3wisemenessentials essential oils are premium, therapeutic quality oils. They are free of any pesticides or chemical residues and all are 100% pure and undiluted. They are harvested and distilled in clean facilities by knowledgeable and caring people. Additionally, they have been gas chromatographically tested to ensure their purity and natural source.

STILL NOT ILLEGAL! Pure, premium, therapeutic quality

Bergamot   Black Pepper   Carrot Seed   Cedarwood   Roman Chamomile   Citronella
Clove Bud   Coriander Seed   Dill Seed   Eucalyptus globulus   Eucalyptus radiata
Sweet Fennel   Frankincense   Geranium   Ginger   Grapefruit   Helichrysum angustifolium
Helichrysum italicum   Jasmine Sambac Absolute   Lavender, Extra   Lemon   Lemon Grass
Lime   Litsea Cubeba   Mandarin   Sweet Marjoram   Melissa   Myrrh   Neroli
Nutmeg, Extra   Orange   Oregano   Palmarosa   Parsley Seed   Peppermint   Rose Otto
Rosewood   Sandalwood Tamil Nadu   Savory Montana   Tea Tree   Red Thyme   Turmeric
Ylang Ylang   Anise Seed   Essential Oil articles   Guidelines


peppermint lavender lemon eucalyptus-globulus orange tea-tree geranium ylang-ylang 3wchamomile helichrysum-angustifolium 3wrose-otto

Invest in, as far as we know, the best premium quality Essential Oil Kit on the market:
Item 083 consists of 11 essential oils of which nine are organic:  a 1 oz. bottle each of Eucalyptus, Lavendar, Lemon, Orange, Peppermint and Tea Tree essential oils;  1/2 oz. bottles of Geranium and Ylang Ylang;   1/6 oz. bottles of Roman Chamomile and Helichrysum italicum and a special 1/12 oz. bottle of our precious select farmed, pure Bulgarian Rose Otto essential oil. Kit includes several informative pdf ebooks.  $199

*********************************************************************

Anise Seed

anise 003 Anise Seed essential oil                     $11/oz.
Botanical Name: Pimpinella anisum
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distillation
Parts Used: Seed
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Spicy, warm, sweet & licorice-like
Largest Producing Countries: India, China, and Spain
Traditional Use: It is used in pipe tobacco, as well as in a popular alcoholic drink in Turkey called ‘raki’, which is made from the seed.
Properties: Antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, galactagogue, stimulant, and stomachic.
Benefits: mmenorhea, asthma, bronchitis, indigestion, catarrh, colds, colic, coughs, cramp, flatulence, increases milk production, indigestion, menopause, muscular aches, palpitations, and rheumatism. Anise can help protect you from harmful organisms, 1/13/14
Blends Well With: Lavender, orange, other spice oils, pine, and rose.
Safety Data: Use in moderation only. Can cause dermatitis, acts as a narcotic and slows down the circulation in large quantities, which can lead to cerebral disorders. Not to be used while pregnant.

*********************************************************************

Bergamot

bergamot 005 Bergamot essential oil                       $29/oz.
Italy; Organic

Bergamot (Citrus aur. bergamia) is a mutation of the sour orange and not a hybrid. In 1600, French perfumers started using Bergamot to enliven fragrances, particularly eau de cologne. It is foremost traditionally considered a miraculous neuro-tonic and a powerful helper against depression caused by fatigue or unreleased tensions and frustrations.
Botanical Name: Citrus aur. bergamia
Common Method Of Extraction: Cold expression, vacuum distillation, and in some cases steam distilled
Parts Used: Peel of the ripe fruit
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Citrus spice with a high floral note
Largest Producing Countries: Italy, California, and Mediterranean countries
Traditional Use: The oil has been used in Italian folk medicine for many years, primarily for fever (including malaria) and worms. It is used to impart a delightful flavor and distinctive aroma to Earl Grey tea.
Properties: Analgesic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, astringent, carminative, cicatrisant, deodorant, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, laxative, parasiticide, rubefacient, sedative, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, vermifuge, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Abscess (cold), acne, anxiety, boils, bronchitis, cancer (uterine), carbuncles, cold sores, colds, colic, cystitis, depression, diphtheria, dyspepsia, eczema, fevers, flatulence, flu, gall stones, glossitis, gonorrhea, halitosis, herpes, infections, insect repellant and insect bites, intestinal parasites, leucorrhoea, loss of appetite, nervous tension, oily complexion, psoriasis, respiratory tract infections, sore throat, thrush, vaginal pruitis, and varicose veins.
Blends Well With: Almost all essential oils, including: black pepper, chamomile, clary sage, coriander, cypress, frankincense, geranium, helichrysum, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, mandarin, melissa, neroli, nutmeg, orange, rosemary, sandalwood, vetiver, violet, ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Avoid in cases of liver problems. Not for use when pregnant or nursing. Possible skin irritant - dilute well. If not specified bergapten-free it may cause photosensitivity (our Bergamot offered is Bergapten free).

*********************************************************************

Black Pepper

black pepper essential oil 006 Black Pepper essential oil                     $29/oz.
India; Organic

Black pepper (Piper nigrum) essential oil is extracted from dried, fully grown yet unripe fruit of the pepper plant - a perennial woody vine with heart shaped leaves and small white flowers. It has been used since antiquity in the culinary and healing arts. Indian monks ate black pepper daily to sustain their endurance and increase their energy. During the spice wars it was a trading commodity. The oil is well used in aromatherapy formulas and in perfumery. It is commonly added to massage blends to enhance circulation. It also adds a lovely 'spicy' note to aromatic and perfume blends.
Botanical Name: Piper nigrum
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distillation
Parts Used: Peppercorns
Note Classification: Middle to base
Aroma: Hot, sharp, bright, fruity, and spicy odor
Largest Producing Countries: India, Malaysia, Madagascar, China, Indonesia
Traditional Use: Used in the East for over 4,000 years for medicinal and culinary purposes. Known to have been used in Chinese medicine, and by the ancient Greeks. In Greece it is used for intermittent fever and to fortify the stomach.
Properties: Analgesic, anticatarrhal, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-toxic, aperitif, aphrodisiac, bactericidal, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, laxative, rubefacient, stimulant, stomachic, tonic (especially of the spleen).
Benefits: Anaemia, arthritis, catarrh, cellulite, chilblains, chills, cholera, cold, colic, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dysentery, dyspepsia, dysuria, encourages bravery and courage, fevers, flatulence, heartburn, helps resolve past emotional issues, increases alertness and improves concentration, influenza, loss of appetite, muscular aches and pains, nausea, neuralgia, poor circulation and muscle tone, quinsy, rheumatic pain, sprains, stiffness, toothache, vertigo, and vomiting.
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, clary sage, clove, coriander, eucalyptus, fennel, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, lavender, juniper, lemon, lemongrass, lime, mandarin, marjoram, myrrh, orange, nutmeg, patchouli, palmarosa, rose, rosemary, sage, sandalwood, spikenard, tea tree, valerian, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-sensitizing, irritant in high concentration due to rubefacient properties. Use in moderation only.

*********************************************************************

Carrot Seed

carrot 009 Carrot Seed essential oil                      $27/oz.
Carrot Seed essential oil (Daucus carota) is steam distilled from the seeds of Wild Carrot - aka Queen Anne's Lace - considered by many who don’t know otherwise to be a 'common roadside weed'. The oil has a unique woody, mildly sweet aroma, and a light, fluid consistency, and lends itself therapeutic use as well as natural perfumery. Carrot See is a premier skin care oil. In the Chinese tradition, it is used to treat dysentery and to expel worms.
Botanical Name: Daucus carota
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Dried seed
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Herbaceous, mild, and spicy
Largest Producing Countries: Hungary and France
Traditional Use: Used in flavoring liquors and in perfume compositions.
Properties: Anthelminthic, antiseptic, carminative, depurative, diuretic, emmenagogue, hepatic, stimulant, tonic, and vasodilatory.
Benefits: Accumulation of toxins, amenorrhea, anemia, anorexia, arthritis, colic, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, eczema, edema, glandular problems, gout, indigestion, liver congestion, mature skin, psoriasis, rashes, reduces wrinkles, regulates the thyroid, rheumatism, and skin irritation.
Blends Well With: Bergamot, cardamom, cassie, cedarwood, citrus oils, frankincense, geranium, mimosa, sandalwood and spice oils.
Safety Data: Do not use during pregnancy as it can cause abortions. Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing.

*********************************************************************

Cedarwood

cedarwood 010 Cedarwood essential oil                   $14/oz.
Morocco; Wild, Organic

Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica) was the first known oil to have been extracted. Noah burned cedarwood incense in thanks for surviving the flood. Tibetans burn cedarwood incense in the temples. Other ancient cultures used cedarwood for sarcophagi and palace and temple building material. This ancient oil was used extensively by the Egyptians in daily beauty rituals. It is one of the basic therapeutic use essential oils employed today.
Botanical Name: Cedrus atlantica
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Wood, stumps, and sawdust
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Woody and fruity with honey overtones
Largest Producing Countries: USA and Morocco
Traditional Use: Famed cedars of Biblical times (Lebanon cedar) provided one of the world’s earliest perfumes. Used by the ancient Egyptians for mummification.
Properties: Antifungal, antiputrescent, antiseborrheic, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, astringent, diuretic, expectorant, insecticide, mucolytic, regenerative, sedative, stimulant (circulatory), and tonic.
Benefits: Acne, air purifier, anxiety, arthritis, bronchitis, cancer, catarrh, cellulite, coughs, dandruff, dermatitis, dry skin and hair, dysuria, eczema, fungal infections, gonorrhea, hair loss, immune stimulant, insect repellant, leucorrhoea, nervous tension, oily skin and hair, pruritis, pyelitis, rashes, respiratory affections, rheumatism, skin infections, stress related conditions, ulcers, and urinary tract disorders. Try cedarwood for dandruff, oily hair and skin problems, 6/12/11
Blends Well With: Bay, bergamot, calamus, cardamom, cassie, roman chamomile, clary sage, costus, cypress, eucalyptus (all), frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, labdanum, lavender, marjoram, mimosa, neroli, olibanum, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, petitgrain, rosemary, rosewood, sandalwood, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Be aware of which Cedar you are using. Make sure that you are using Cedrus (Cedarwood Atlas), not Juniperus or Thuja. Use in low dilutions (1%), may sensitize skin, and avoid during pregnancy. Those with elevated blood pressure should avoid cedarwood.

*********************************************************************

Roman Chamomile

chamomile 011 Roman Chamomile essential oil        $83/oz.
France; Organic

Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) has had a medicinal reputation in the Mediterranean region for over 2000 years, and is still in widespread use. In ancient Egypt and early Scandinavian culture chamomile was associated with the sun god, and it was also held to be the “plants’ physician”, since it promoted the health of plants nearby. It has one of the highest contents of esters of any known essential oil. Even in very small concentrations, whether alone or in combination with other oils, Roman Chamomile essential oil has a soothing, calming effect. It helps relieves cramps, spasms, and can assist in mild shock.
Botanical Name: Anthemis nobilis
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Flower heads
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Fruity, fresh, herbaceous scent with sweet rich balsamic undertone
Largest Producing Countries: USA, Britain, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, France.
Traditional Use: Extensively used in cosmetics, soaps, detergents, high-class perfumes and hair and bath products.
Properties: Analgesic, anti-anemic, antibiotic, antidepressant anti-inflammatory, antineuralgic, antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cholagogue, cicatrizant, digestive, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hepatic, hypnotic, immunostimulant, nerve sedative, stomachic, sudorific, tonic, vermifuge, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Acne, arthritis, boils, burns, chilblains, colic, cuts, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, earache, eczema, fevers, hair care, headache, indigestion, inflammations, insect bites, insomnia, menopausal problems, menorrhagia, migraine, muscular pain, nausea, nervous tension, neuralgia, pain relief, rashes, rheumatism, sensitive skin, skin allergies, sprains, stress related complaints, teething pain, toothache, and wounds.
Nepalese use chamomile to scare off wayward rhinos, 9/30/11; Chamomile helps with anxiety, sleeplessness and depression, 12/21/11; Top five essential oils for stress relief and how to properly use them, 5/23/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13
Blends Well With: Bergamot, clary sage, eucalyptus, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, labdanum, lavender, lemon, mandarin, neroli, oakmoss, palmarosa, patchouli, rose otto, sandalwood, tea tree.and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic and non-irritant. Occasionally, contact dermatitis has occurred with this oil and those who are allergic to the Ragweed family should probably not use it.

*********************************************************************

Cinnamon

Cinnamon essential oil Yes Cinnamon Really Works and is Killing Lyme Disease, Bartonella, and Babesia!, 9/3/14

*********************************************************************

Citronella

citronella 013 Citronella essential oil               $11/oz.
Sri Lanka; Wildcrafted

Citronella is commonly known for it's natural insect repellent properties, though it has many other uses in aromatherapy. The oil is steam distilled from a tall, aromatic, perennial grass originally native to Sri Lanka. This oil is the known as Java citronella, and has a fresh, powerful, lemon-like scent. It is higher in Citronellal and Citronellol than the Ceylon/nardus variety. Uplifting and refreshing its aroma is good at scaring away cold, flu and fatigue.
Botanical Name: Cymbopogon nardus
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Fresh, part-dried grass
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Fresh, lemony, woody-sweet fragrance
Largest Producing Countries: Vietnam and Java
Traditional Use: Extensively used in soaps, detergents, household goods and industrial perfumes. Employed in insect repellent formulations against moths, ants, fleas, for use in the home and in the garden.
Properties: Antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, deodorant, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, fungicidal, insecticide, stomachic, tonic, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Colds, excessive perspiration, fatigue, flu, hair oil, headaches, heart stimulant, insect repellant, migraine, minor infections, neuralgia, and oily skin.
Blends Well With: Bergamot, cedarwood, geranium, lavender, lemon, orange, and peppermint, pine.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant; may cause dermatitis in some individuals. Avoid during pregnancy.

*********************************************************************

Clove Bud

clove-bud 015 Clove Bud essential oil                         $12
Madagascar; Eco-ethical

Botanical Name: Eugenia caryophyllata
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Unopened dry flower buds
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Warm, spicy, sometimes floral and woody odor with a subnote of leather
Largest Producing Countries: Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and Madagascar
Traditional Use: In Chinese medicine the oil is used for diarrhea, hernia, bad breath and bronchitis. Used in dental preparations, and as a fragrance component in toothpastes, soaps, toiletries, cosmetics and perfumes, the production of printing ink, glue and varnish.
Properties: Analgesic, anthelminthic, antibiotic, anti-emetic, antifungal, antihistaminic, anti-infectious, antineuralgic, anti-oxidant, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antiviral, aphrodisiacal, carminative, counter-irritant, expectorant, general stimulant, larvicidal, parasiticide, spasmolytic, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Acne, arthritis, asthma, athlete’s foot, bronchitis, bruises, burns, chest infections, colds, colic, cuts, diarrhea, dyspepsia, general exhaustion, flu, insect repellent (mosquito), mental debility, muscle pain, nausea, recovery from infections, rheumatism, ringworm, scabies, sprains, stress, tired limbs, toothache, ulcers, verrucas, and warts. Discover the astounding healing properties of clove oil, 9/15/11; Miracle of Cloves and Clove Oil, 5/20/12; Five unbeatable essential oils to help stop chronic digestive distress, 7/14/13; Clove oil alleviates toothaches, improves dental health, 4/9/14
Blends Well With: Allspice, basil, bay, bergamot, black pepper, roman chamomile, clary sage, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, lime, mandarin, neroli, nutmeg, orange, palmarosa, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, vanilla, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Only the bud oil, and not the leaf or stem oil should be used. May cause skin irritation on sensitive skin. Avoid during pregnancy. Do not use on children under 12 years or in baths. Use in moderation only in low dilution (less than 1%).

*********************************************************************

Coriander Seed

coriander 016 Coriander Seed essential oil           $15/oz.
Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) has been a popular aromatic stimulant and culinary spice cultivated for over 3,000 years. It is mentioned in all medieval medical texts, by the Greeks, in the Bible, and by early Sanskrit writers. Indigenous to the Holy land, Coriander was compared by the Ancient Hebrews to the manna provided by God to the Children of Israel and was one of the bitter herbs eaten during Passover. The Ancient Egyptians believed it to the 'secret to happiness' and combined it with fresh garlic in wine to be drunk as an aphrodisiac. In fact, it is used today in flavoring liqueurs such as Chartreuse and Benedictine.
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Seed
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Sweet, woody-spicy, slightly musky
Largest Producing Countries: Russia and Romania
Traditional Use: Used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceutical preparations, especially digestive remedies.
Properties: Analgesic, antibacterial, anti-depressive, anti-infectious, anti-oxidant, anti-rheumatic, antispasmodic, aperitif, aphrodisiac, bactericidal, depurative, digestive, carminative, cytotoxic, fungicidal, larvicidal, lipolytic, neurotonic, revitalizing, sedative, stimulant (cardiac, circulatory, nervous system), stomachic, and tonic.
Benefits: Accumulation of fluids and toxins, anorexia, arthritis, blackheads, cellulite, colds, colic, debility, diarrhea, digestive problems, dyspepsia, gout, infections (general), inspires creativity, flatulence, flu, measles, mental fatigue, migraine, muscular aches and pains, natural deodorant, nausea, nervous exhaustion, neuralgia, offers comfort, oily skin, piles, poor circulation, promotes joy, refreshes and energizes, rheumatism, spasm, stiffness, stomach cramps, and TMJ; Scientists discover natural substance fights superbugs and food poisoning, 8/30/11
Blends Well With: Bergamot, black pepper, cardamom, cinnamon, citronella, clary sage, clove, cypress, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lemon, neroli, nutmeg, olibanum, orange, palmarosa, petitgrain, pine, ravensara, sandalwood, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Dilute before using externally. Generally non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. Stupefying in large doses – use in moderation. Cross sensitivity reported with fennel and anise; considered a known allergen, avoid with fibrosis (breast cancer).

*********************************************************************

Dill Seed

dill-seed 018 Dill Seed essential oil                     $16/oz.
Botanical Name: Anethum graveolens
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Seed
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Clear, spicy, herbaceous, grass, fresh, and clean
Largest Producing Countries: Bulgaria, France, Hungary, Germany, Britain, and Spain
Traditional Use: Used extensively in alcoholic, soft drinks and foodstuffs, especially pickles and condiments.
Properties: Amenorrhea, antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, digestive, emmenagogue, galactagogue, hypotensive, stimulant, and stomachic.
Benefits: Colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, indigestion, lack of a menstrual cycle, and promotes milk flow in nursing mothers.
Blends Well With: Caraway, elemi, mints, nutmeg, spice and citrus oils.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Eucalyptus globulus & radiata

eucalyptus-globulus 019 Eucalyptus globulus essential oil       $13
Brasil; Organic, unrectified
eucalyptus-radiata 020 Eucalyptus radiata essential oil                 $11
Australia

Botanical Name: Eucalyptus globulus (below right), Eucapyptus radiata (top left)
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Leaves
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Strong, woody camphorous
Largest Producing Countries: Australia, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Russia, USA, and China
Traditional Use: Typically used in the preparation of liniments, inhalants, cough syrups, ointments, toothpaste, and as pharmaceutical flavoring.
Properties: Analgesic, antibiotic, antifungal, anti-infectious, anti-neuralgic, antiparasitic, antiputrescent, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, balsamic, cicatrizant, decongestant, deodorant, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, hypoglycemic, pectoral, prophylactic, rubefacient, stimulant, vermifuge, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Asthma, blisters, bronchitis, burns, catarrh, chickenpox, chilblains, colds, cuts, cystitis, fever, flu, headaches, herpes, insect bites, leucorrhea, lice, measles, mental exhaustion, muscular aches and pains, nervous debility, neuralgia, poor circulation, rashes, rheumatism, sinusitis, skin infections, skin ulcers, sluggishness, sore throats, sprains, throat infections, and wounds. Long term or chronic respiratory ailments are alleviated especially with the radiata variety as it is an easier aroma to inhale directly
Use eucalyptus oil to breathe easier, kill germs, and more, 10/30/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; Eucalyptus is quite effective with respiratory problems and head lice, 5/5/14; Top five health benefits of eucalyptus oil, 6/18/14
Blends Well With: Cedarwood, chamomile german, chamomile roman, cypress, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, juniper, lavender, lemon, marjoram, peppermint, pine, rosemary, thyme linalool, and thyme red.
Safety Data: Not to be used on children under 12 years. Not compatible with homeopathic treatment. Non-irritant, non-toxic, non-sensitizing, however its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Sweet Fennel

sweet-fennel 021 Sweet Fennel essential oil                            $26
Italy; Organic

Botanical Name: Foeniculum vulgare
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Crushed seeds
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Very sweet, anise-like, slightly earthy-peppery
Largest Producing Countries: Italy, France, and Greece
Traditional Use: In pharmaceutical products it is used in cough drops, lozenges, carminative and laxative preparations. In the food industry it is utilized in all of the major food categories, as well as soft drinks and alcoholic drinks. The cosmetic industry adds fennel to soaps, toiletries and perfumes, and room sprays.
Properties: Antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aperitif, carminative, depurative, diuretic, emmenagogue, estrogen-like, expectorant, galactagogue, laxative, orexigenic, regenerative, splenic, stimulant (circulatory), stomachic, tonic, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Abdominal pains or cramps, amenorrhea, anorexia, antidote for poisonous mushrooms, asthma, bronchitis, bruises, calms, cellulitis, child birthing (inhaled), colic, constipation, coughs, digestive problems, dull complexion, dyspepsia, edema, fertility, flatulence, fluid retention, hiccough, improves memory, insufficient milk (nursing mothers), liver problems, mature skin, menopausal problems, nausea, obesity, oily skin, PMS, pyorrhea, rheumatism, and sore throats.
Blends Well With: Bergamot, black pepper, cardamom, cypress, dill, fir, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, juniper, lavender, lemon, mandarin, marjoram, niaouli, orange, pine, ravensara, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, tangerine, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-irritant, relatively non-toxic, narcotic in large doses. It should not be used on epileptics, during pregnancy, those with endometriosis, or estrogen-dependent cancer. Use only in moderation.

*********************************************************************

Frankincense

frankincense 022 Frankincense essential oil  $56/oz.
Oman; Organic, Wildcrafted

Frankincense (Boswellia carterii) is one of the 'holy' oils from ancient times when it was considered more valuable than gold. It been used for 5000 years for spiritual healing and was used in ancient Egypt in the embalming process. Frankincense symbolizes divinity.
Upon first glance, the frankincense tree may seem rather unremarkable. It appears as a giant shrub, with many knurled branches topped with abundant slender leaves and sometimes, small white flowers. Native to northern Africa, it looks like it belongs in the desert, growing in some of the world's harshest conditions. It is the sap of the that has such profound lore surrounding it. When the tree's bark is pierced with a knife (known traditionally as a 'mingaf'), a milky-white oleoresin is exuded - thought the tree is not harmed (myrrh is harvested this way as well). The resin forms droplets known as 'tears' or 'pearls', which harden into the orangish, brownish gum known as Frankincense. It has a powerful and enticing wood aroma that sweetly sparkles with freshness and spice. Frankincense maintains its integrity in any blend.
It is an excellent oil for grief and is probably best known for its enduring emotional and spiritual support. Often used in religious ceremonies Frankincense makes a wonderful anointing oil as it is thought to possess powers to heal almost every conceivable malady. It is the quintessential oil for letting go and enhancing meditation practice, having the power to uplift human awareness to a higher level by freeing the nerves from excessive tension, allowing us to focus on the underlying transcendental unity of our inner Self.
Botanical Name: Boswellia carterii
Status: Wildcrafted
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Oleoresin
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Expansive, clean, dry, woody, conifer, fruity, pepper, and spicy
Largest Producing Countries: Kenya, Oman, Somalia, Ethiopia, and Saudia Arabia
Traditional Use: The gum and oil are used as fixatives and fragrance components in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes, especially oriental, spice and men’s fragrances. Because frankincense has the ability to slow down and deepen the breath it has been used for thousands of years in ceremonial incense for meditation and prayer.
Properties: Antibacterial, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, balsamic, carminative, cicatrizant, cytophylactic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, immunostimulant, pectoral, revitalizer, sedative, stimulant, tonic, uterine, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Acne scars, anxiety, asthma, blemishes, bronchial catarrh, bronchitis, carbuncles, circulation problems, colds, coughs, cystitis, dry and mature skin, dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, eases paranoia, flu, gonorrhea, hemorrhage, hemorrhoids, immune deficiencies, laryngitis, leprosy, leucorrhea, mental fatigue, nervous depression, nervous tension, prevents wrinkles, promotes awareness, relieves confusion and guilt, rheumatism, scars, scrofula, skin diseases or disorders, ulcers, urinary tract infections, and wounds. See: Essential Oils As Cancer Treatments - Research Updates on Frankincense and Lemongrass Oils; Frankincense: Could it be a cure for cancer?; Frankincense Essential Oil is Useful To Cure Cancer; Frankincense Oil and Cancer – A Quality Standard Approaches; Skin Cancer - Frankincense and Other Essential Oils; Frankincense & Cancer; Got arthritis pain?, 7/3/11; Ancient herbal remedy proven to be effective against arthritis, 9/20/11; Cancer industry trying to co-opt most recent potential natural cure - frankincense, 3/20/12; Top five essential oils for stress relief and how to properly use them, 5/23/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; 22 Powerful Uses of Frankincense Essential Oil, 11/21/14; Health benefits of frankincense and myrrh, 2/17/15; Frankincense oil kills cancer cells while boosting the immune system, 7/27/16
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, black pepper, camphor, cedarwood, cinnamon, clary sage, coriander, cypress, geranium, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, mandarin, mimosa, myrrh, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, ylang ylang, and other spices.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing.

*********************************************************************

Geranium

geranium 023 Geranium essential oil                     $32/oz.
South Africa; Organic

During the 1600’s, Dutch sailors transported geraniums to Europe from Africa, which gardeners then planted to help ensure that no evil spirits would enter their homes. The Colonial Americans used geranium leaves to line baking pans to impart a delicate rose flavor to their cakes. There are approximately 700 varieties of geranium, only about 10 of which supply essential oil. Harvesting just as the leaves turn yellow captures the unique rose-like aroma; previous to this, the aroma is lemonier.
Botanical Name: Pelargonium graveolens
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Flowers and flowering tops
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Herbaceous, green, sweet, slightly floral
Largest Producing Countries: Egypt, Reunion, Russia, and China
Traditional Use: Used as a fragrance component in all kinds of cosmetic products: soaps, creams, and perfumes. It is also is employed as a flavoring agent in most major food categories, alcoholic and soft drinks.
Properties: Analgesic, antibacterial, antibiotic, antidepressant, antihemorrhagic, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, cicatrizant, deodorant, diuretic, fungicidal, haemostatic, regenerative, sedative, stimulant of the adrenal cortex, styptic, tonic, vermifuge, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Acne, antidepressant, athlete’s foot, balancing for both oily and dry skin, broken capillaries, bruises, burns, calming, cancer (uterine), candida, cellulitis, circulatory disorders, depression, dermatitis, diabetes, diarrhea, eczema, edema, engorgement of breasts, female reproductive disorders, fertility, gastralgia, glossitis, hemorrhoids, herpes, jaundice, kidney stones, lice, menopause, mosquito repellent, nervous tension, neuralgia (facial), ophthalmia, pediculosis, PMS, ringworm, shingles, sore throats, sterility, stimulates the psyche, stomatitis, tonsillitis, ulcers (internal and external), and wounds. Repel ticks with this natural oil, 8/9/14
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, black pepper, chamomile roman, clary sage, clove, cypress, fennel, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, mandarin, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, peppermint, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, generally non-sensitizing; possible contact dermatitis in hypersensitive individuals, especially with the Bourbon type.

*********************************************************************

Ginger

ginger 024 Ginger essential oil                        $43/oz.
Madagascar; Organic

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) was one of the first products to travel the “spice route” from Asia to Europe, where both the Greeks and Romans made extensive use of it. Romans took advantage of its aphrodisiac powers and added it to wine, while Hawaiians scented their clothing. In Senegal, West Africa, the women make belts with the rhizome, in the hope of arousing their partner’s sexual interest. Ginger essential oil may be added to almost any massage blend and it is noted to assist other essential oils in reaching their target organs.
Botanical Name: Zingiber officinale
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Sun dried rhizomes called “hands”
Note Classification: Middle to base
Aroma: Hot, spicy, and sweet
Largest Producing Countries: Indonesia, Britain, China, and India
Traditional Use: It is used in digestive, carminative and laxative preparations; used as a fragrance component in cosmetics and perfumes, especially oriental and men’s fragrances.
Properties: Analgesic, antibacterial, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, aperitif, aphrodisiac, appetite stimulant, carminative, cephalic, diaphoretic, expectorant, febrifuge, laxative, rubefacient, stimulant, stomachic, and tonic.
Benefits: Arthritis, bruises, catarrh, chills, colds, colic, congestion, coughs, cramp, debility, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, flatulence, flu, fractures, improves memory, indigestion, infectious disease, loss of appetite, muscular aches and pains, nausea, nervous exhaustion, poor circulation, promotes courage, rheumatism, seasickness, sexual tonic, sharpens senses, sinusitis, sore throat, sprains, and travel sickness.
Blends Well With: Bergamot, blackpepper, cedarwood, clove, coriander, eucalyptus (all), frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lemon, lime, mandarin, neroli, nutmeg, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, peppermint, rose, rosemary, rosewood, sandalwood, tea tree, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant (except in high concentration), slightly phototoxic. May sensitize skin; use low dilution’s (1%). Avoid on face, neck, babies, and children.

*********************************************************************

Grapefruit

grapefruit 025 Grapefruit essential oil                      $22/oz.
Organic

Botanical Name: Citrus x paridisi
Common Method Of Extraction: Cold pressed
Parts Used: Rind
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Citrus, floral, and fruity
Largest Producing Countries: USA
Traditional Use: Employed as a fragrance component in soaps, detergents, cosmetics and perfumes. Extensively used in deserts, soft drinks and alcoholic beverages.
Properties: Antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiseptic, antitoxic, astringent, bactericidal, depurative, digestive, diuretic, restorative, stimulant (lymphatic, digestive), and tonic.
Benefits: Acne, cellulitis, chills, colds, congested and oily skin, depression, flu, gall bladder, hangovers, headaches, herpes, hot flashes, induces euphoria, menopause, menstrual problems, muscle fatigue, nervous exhaustion, obesity, performance stress, PMS, promotes hair growth, relieves performance anxiety, stiffness, tones the skin and tissues, and water retention. Like many of the citrus oils, it has a unique 'fat dissolving' characteristic. This is the essential oil most noted for use in reducing cellulite, (it can be used by itself, or in a carrier and massaged into those areas) and can be included in massage blends for this application. 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; Grapefruit and helichrysum extract combat diabetes and obesity, 9/5/14
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, black pepper, cardamom, cedarwood, citronella, clary sage, clove, cypress, eucalyptus (all), fennel, frankincense, geranium, ginger, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, mandarin, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, peppermint, rosemary, thyme linalool, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and relatively non-sensitizing. Some cases of skin irritation have been reported so use with caution. Not to be used while pregnant.

*********************************************************************

Helichrysum angustifolium & italicum

helichrysum-angustifolium 026 Helichrysum angustifolium essential oil
Organic                                                              $92/oz.
027 Helichrysum italicum essential oil
Croatia; Wild, Organic                                  $108/oz.

The generic name helichrysum derives from the Greek helios (sun) and chrysos (gold), as the flower heads resemble little golden suns. There are about 500 species of helichrysum, of which only a few produce essential oil for distillation.
The two varieties considered the best for therapeutic use are Helichrysum italica and Helichrysum angustifolium. The shrubby plants are almost identical, except in size, the former growing to a height of 60cm and the Italian variety reaching just 30cm.
Along with frankincense, myrrh, spikenard, and rose, helichrysum is ranked with the most ancient and valuable healing substances in the world. Helichrysum is one of the most important essential oils in aromatherapy because of its profound and wideranging healing properties, and because it works well in combination with many other essential oils; enabling the other oils to be even more effective than they would be by themselves.
Helichrysum is more anti-inflammatory than German Chamomile, more tissue regenerating than Lavender, more cicatrisant (helping the formation of scar tissue and preventing scarring) than Frankincense. It heals physical and emotional scarring, opens the heart, connects body and spirit, and opens human beings to spiritual life. Helichrysum oil is also known as Everlasting Oil or Immortelle.
The essential oil of helichrysum is captured by steam distillation of the flowering tops. The yield is very low relative to other essential oil plants and this of course is reflected in a relatively high value and price.
Botanical Name: Helichrysum angustifolium, Helichrysum italicum
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Fresh flowers and flowering tops
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Powerful, rich honey-like scent with a delicate tea-like undertone
Largest Producing Countries: France, Italy, and Spain
Traditional Use: Used as a fixative in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes.
Properties: Analgesic, anti-allergenic, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, astringent, cholagogue, cicatrizant, diuretic, expectorant, fungicidal, hepatic, nervine, and stimulant.
Benefits: Abscess, acne, allergic conditions, asthma, bactericidal infections, boils, bronchitis, bruising, burns, chronic coughs, circulatory disorders, colds, cuts, debility, depression, dermatitis, eczema, fever, flu, lethargy, liver congestion, muscular aches and pains, nervous exhaustion, neuralgia, pain relief, rheumatism, scarring, skin inflammation, spleen congestion, sprains, strained muscles, stress-related conditions, whooping coughs, and wounds. Grapefruit and helichrysum extract combat diabetes and obesity, 9/5/14
Blends Well With: Bergamot, black pepper, cedarwood, chamomile german, clary sage, clove, cypress, eucalyptus citriodora, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, juniper, labdanum, lavender, lemon, lime, mandarin, mimosa, neroli, niaouli, oakmoss, orange, oregano, palmarosa, pine, ravensara, rose, rosemary, sage, tea tree, thyme linalol, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Recipe: Make a massage oil for sprains, strains, aching muscles and arthritic joints. Mix two drops each of helichrysum, lavender and clary-sage essential oils in two tablespoons of sweet almond oil. Massage into affected areas.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. Helichrysum oil should not be used by children younger than 12 or by pregnant women. Also, helichrysum can evoke powerful emotions in some individual and should therefore be used in moderation.

*********************************************************************

Jasmine Sambac Absolute

jasmine-sambac 081513e 030 Jasmine Sambac Absolute                 $222/oz.
India; Eco-ethical

Jasmine is the most masculine of all the floral oils, and since ancient times, it has been referred to as the King of oils (Rose is the Queen).
An absolute is extracted from Jasmine flowers, as they are considered too delicate to process through steam distillation. The advantage of the absolute is that the complete aroma of this wonderful flower is preserved in the resultant oil. Jasmine sambac is most highly valued in aromatherapy for its euphoric, sensual qualities.
In India, jasmine is associated with the Hindu god of love, Kama, who, like the Greek Eros and the Roman Cupid, is represented with a bow, which has arrows tipped with jasmine blossoms, in order to pierce the heart with desire. Along with hyacinth and rose, it also made a frequent appearance in Sufi poetry as a symbol of love and spiritual longing. For centuries, women have treasured it for its seductive, beautiful fragrance.
It takes 1,000 lbs. of carefully hand-picked blossoms to produce one pound of Jasmine Absolute precious oil. Jasmine’s flowers open at twilight releasing its intriguing floral bouquet. The blossoms are collected before sunrise, and handled with care to preserve their delicate scent.
Botanical Name: Jasminum sambac
Origin: India
Description: Jasmine Sambac is a beautiful plant; its flowers bloom late in the evening unlike Jasmine Grandiflorum that blooms in the early dawn.
Parts Used: Flowers
Common Uses: Jasmine Sambac is well regarded as an aphrodisiac, though it is also considered an antidepressant, sedative, and antispasmodic. Used extensively in soaps, toiletries, cosmetics, and perfumes, especially high-class floral and oriental fragrances.
Properties: Analgesic (mild), antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, cicatrisant, expectorant, galactagogue, parturient, sedative, and tonic (especially uterine).
Benefits: Amenorrhea, anxiety, catarrh, cough, depression, dry skin, dysmenorrhea, frigidity, headache, hoarseness, impotence, labor pains, laryngitis, menstrual problems, muscular spasms, nervous chills, prostate problems, skin care, sprains, stress related conditions, and uterine disorders. Spice up your love life with jasmine, 9/27/13; Consider using jasmine to help revitalize your mind and body, 1/12/14
Consistency: Viscous
Note: Middle to Base
Blends well with: Jasmine Sambac generally works with all oils. It helps to round out scents, and tends to work particularly well with other aphrodisiac oils (sandalwood and ylang ylang are two great examples).
Aromatic Description: Jasmine Sambac is an incredibly intense aroma that is very floral, yet more musky and masculine than Jasmine Grandiflorum.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, generally non-sensitizing (an allergic reaction has been known to occur in some individuals) For perfume use only and not to be ingested. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Juniper essential oil
Use juniper essential oil as a hair and scalp tonic, 11/5/11

*********************************************************************

Lavender, Extra

031414b 041215e49 121614y41 lavender 032 Lavender, Extra essential oil   $19/oz.
Bulgaria; Eco-ethical

The name “lavender” is derived from the Latin lavare, meaning, “to wash”. Known as one of the seven polyvalents (effective against many toxins), which are applicable to many ailments. Greeks and Romans perfumed their bathwater with lavender, burned lavender incense to appease their wrathful gods, and believed the scent of lavender to be soothing even to untamed lions and tigers.
It was in the middle of the last century that the term 'Aromatherapy' was coined by French cosmetic chemist Rene-Maurice Gattefosse - Dr. Gattefosse discovered the healing properties of Lavender oil when, after burning his hands in a laboratory accident, he submersed them in the flower's essential oil. His amazingly speedy recovery prompted him to write his book 'Aromatherapy' in 1937.
Botanical Name: Lavendula off. Var. vera
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Flowers
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Fresh, herbaceous, floral
Largest Producing Countries: Bulgaria and France
Traditional Use: Used in pharmaceutical antiseptic, ointments, burn salves, and as a fragrance. Extensively employed in all types of soaps, lotions, perfumes, etc.
Properties: Analgesic, anticonvulsive, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, antitussive, antivenomus, carminative, cholagogue, choleretic, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, decongestant, deodorant, diuretic, emmenagogue, hypotenser, insecticide, nervine, parasiticide, rubefacient, sedative, splenetic, stimulant, sudorific, tonic, vermifuge, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Abscess, acne, allergies, alopeica areata, asthma, athlete’s foot, blenorrhea, blepharitits, boils, bronchitis, bruises, burns, carbuncles, catarrh, childbirth, chlorosis, colic, conjunctivitis, cramps, cystitis, dandruff, depression, dermatitis, diarrhea, diphtheria, dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, earache, eczema, epilepsy, fainting, fistula (anal), flatulence, flu, gall stones, gonorrhea, halitosis, headache, hiccups, hoarseness, hypertension, hysteria, inflammations, insect bites and stings, insect repellant, insomnia, laryngitis, leucorrhea, lice, lumbago, migraine, nausea, nervous tension, neurasthenia, oliguria, palpitations, pediculosis, PMT, psoriasis, rashes, rheumatism, ringworm, scabies, sciatica, scrofula, shock, sore muscles, sprains, stiff joints, stress, sunburn, sunstroke, throat infections, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, ulcers, vertigo, vomiting, whooping cough, and wounds. See: Lavender oil is a powerful antifungal that fights skin conditions, Candida, 2/23/11; Effective in combating fungal infections, 7/25/11; Use essential oils to treat and heal acne, 9/2/11; Pretty flowers that heal, 10/5/11; Lavender kills antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, 3/2/13; Top five essential oils for stress relief and how to properly use them, 5/23/13; Lavender and its high vibrational frequency, 8/10/13; Smelling lavender and rosemary essential oils stimulates free radical scavenging activity, protecting cells, 8/19/13; Dump toxic pharmaceuticals and use lavender essential oil for migraine headache relief instead, 8/22/13; Lavender oil is for healing, 9/14/13; Six powerful ways to use lavender during the cold and flu season, 10/9/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; Surprising medicinal uses for lavender oil, 6/18/15
Blends Well With: Bergamot, black pepper, cedarwood, german and roman chamomile, clary sage, clove, cypress, eucalyptus, geranium, grapefruit, juniper, labdanum, lemon, lemongrass, mandarin, marjoram, oakmoss, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, peppermint, pine, ravensara, rose, rosemary, tea tree, thyme linalol, and vetiver.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing.

*********************************************************************

Lemon

lemon 033 Lemon essential oil                                   $11/oz.
Argentina; Organic

Known as one of the seven polyvalents (effective against many toxins), which are applicable to many ailments. Its reputation grew when the British Navy issued large quantities of the fruit to counteract the onslaught of scurvy and other vitamin-deficiency problems on lengthy sea voyages. Used diffused in the atmosphere in banks and other commercial buildings in Japan to reduce worker error.
In many European countries, the oil is considered somewhat of a 'cure all', particularly with infectious illness. Lemon also serves well as an insect repellent, alone or in blends.
Botanical Name: Citrus limonium
Common Method Of Extraction: Cold pressed
Parts Used: Peel
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Clean, citrus, sugary, with a bit of spice
Largest Producing Countries: Italy, Cyprus, Guinea, Israel, and USA
Traditional Use: Used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals. Extensively used as a fragrance component in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, toilet waters and perfumes. Employed by the food industry in most types of product, including alcoholic and soft drinks.
Properties: Anti-anemic, antibiotic, antidepressant, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antisclerotic, antiscorbutic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, astringent, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cicatrisant, depurative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, febrifuge, haemostatic, hypotensive, immunostimulant, insecticidal, rubefacient, sedative, stimulant, tonic, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Acne, anemia, arthritis, boils, brittle fingernails, bronchitis, catarrh, chilblains, colds, corns, counteracts stomach acidity, cuts, depression, detoxification, digestion, dyspepsia, fever, flu, general fatigue, herpes, infectious diseases, insect bites, mouth ulcers, obesity, oily skin, rheumatism, sore throat, varicose veins, warts, and wrinkles. See: Orange & Lemon Essential Oils Anti-Cancer Effects; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; 33 Awesome Uses of Lemon Essential Oil, 4/16/14
Blends Well With: Benzoin, chamomile, citronella, elemi, eucalyptus, fennel, frankincense, geranium, juniper, labdanum, lavender, lime, neroli, oakmoss, olibanum, orange, peppermint, rose, sandalwood, ylang ylang, and other citrus oils.
Safety Data: Should not be used on the skin prior to exposure to the sun or to tanning lights. Non-toxic, may cause dermal irritation or sensitization reactions in some individuals – apply in moderation. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Lemon Grass

lemongrass 034 Lemon Grass essential oil           $16/oz.
Organic

Botanical Name: Cymbopogon citrates
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Fresh and partially dried leaves
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Lemony, straw like, green
Largest Producing Countries: Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Madagascar, and Guatemala
Traditional Use: Extensively used as a fragrance component in soaps, detergents, cosmetics and perfumes. Also used for the isolation of citral and for the adulteration of more costly oils such as verbena or melissa.
Properties: Analgesic, antidepressant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antipyretic, antiseptic, antiviral, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, deodorant, depurative, digestive, febrifuge, fungicidal, galactagogue, insecticidal, nervine, sedative, tonic, and vasodilator.
Benefits: Acne, athletes foot, cellulite, colitis, digestion, excessive sweat, fevers, gastroenteritis, headaches, infectious disease, insect repellant, muscular pain, nervous exhaustion and stress-related condition, open sores, pediculosis, poor circulation, scabies, and slack tissue. See: Essential Oils As Cancer Treatments - Research Updates on Frankincense and Lemongrass Oils; Use essential oils to treat and heal acne, 9/2/11; Six awesome ways to use lemongrass essential oil, 7/8/15
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, black pepper, cedarwood, clary sage, coriander, cypress, eucalyptus, fennel, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, marjoram, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, rosemary, tea tree, thyme linalol, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Must be diluted. Non-toxic, but possible dermal irritation and/or sensitization may occur in some individuals, use with care. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Lime

lime 035 Lime essential oil                                     $13/oz.
Organic

Botanical Name: Citrus aurantifolia
Common Method Of Extraction: Cold pressed
Parts Used: Peel of the unripe fruit
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Citrus, tart, sweet, with some spice
Largest Producing Countries: Mexico, USA, Cuba, and Italy
Traditional Use: Used as a fragrance component in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes.
Properties: Antirheumatic, antiscorbutic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, aperitif, astringent, bactericidal, deodorant, febrifuge, restorative, and tonic.
Benefits: Acne, anemia, arthritis, asthma, boils, brittle nails, bronchitis, catarrh, cellulitis, chilblains, colds, corns, cuts, dyspepsia, fever and infections, flu, greasy skin, herpes, high blood pressure, insect bites, liver pain, mouth ulcers, nosebleeds, obesity (congestion), poor circulation, rheumatism, stomach cramps, throat infections, varicose veins, and warts. Lime is especially good for internal parasites.
Blends Well With: Citronella, clary sage, geranium, grapefruit, lavandin, lavender, lemon, neroli, nutmeg, orange, rose, rosemary, tonka bean, vanilla, vetiver, ylang ylang, and other citrus oils.
Safety Data: Should not be used on skin prior to exposure to the sun or tanning lights. Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Litsea Cubeba

litsea 036 Litsea Cubeba essential oil         $11/oz.
Brasil; Wildcrafted

Botanical Name: Litsea cubeba
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Fruit
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Spicy, lemon, citrus, with vegetative notes
Largest Producing Countries: China , Taiwan , and Japan
Traditional Use: Used as a fragrance component in air fresheners, soaps, deodorant, colognes, toiletries, and perfumes.
Properties: Antibiotic, antidepressant, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, deodorant, insecticidal, sedative, stimulant, stomachic, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Acne, anxiety, arrhythmia, cellulite, dermatitis, epidemics, excessive perspiration, flatulence, gastric ulcers, general tonic, high blood pressure, indigestion, insect repellant, nervous depression, oily skin, poor appetite, relaxing, sanitation, stress, and tissue toning.
Blends Well With: Basil, bay, black pepper, cardamom, cedarwood, chamomile roman, clary sage, coriander, cypress, eucalyptus citriodora, eucalyptus radiata, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, juniper, marjoram, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, petitgrain, rosemary, sandalwood, tea tree, thyme linalol, vetiver, and ylang ylang.

*********************************************************************

Mandarin

mandarin 037 Mandarin essential oil                       $17/oz.
Italy; Organic

Botanical Name: Citrus reticulata
Common Method Of Extraction: Cold pressed
Parts Used: Outer peel
Note Classification: Top to Middle
Aroma: Warm, citrus, fruity, with a complex floral odor
Largest Producing Countries: Italy, Spain, Algeria, Cyprus, Greece, Brazil, and USA
Traditional Use: Used in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes, especially colognes.
Properties: Its properties resemble those of chamomile more than other citrus oils. Antiseptic, antispasmodic, calmative, carminative, digestive, diuretic (mild), hypnotic, laxative (mild), sedative, stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), and tonic.
Benefits: Acne, congested and oily skin, constipation, dyspepsia, fluid retention, hiccoughs, indigestion, insomnia, intestinal problems, nervous tension, obesity, restlessness, scars, skin disorders, and stretch marks. 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13
Blends Well With: Basil, black pepper, roman chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lemon, myrrh, neroli, nutmeg, palmarosa, patchouli, petitgrain, rose, sandalwood, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. Possibly photo toxic, although it has not been demonstrated decisively.

*********************************************************************

Manuka essential oil: Manuka Oil Conquers Deadly MRSA Bacteria Where Conventional Medicine Fails, 5/23/13

*********************************************************************

Sweet Marjoram

sweet-marjoram 038 Sweet Marjoram essential oil             $23/oz.
Egypt; Organic

The herb has a long tradition in culinary use and as a 'folk' remedy. It was used by the ancient Greeks in fragrances, cosmetics and medicines. It's original name comes from a greek word meaning 'joy of the mountains'. It was planted on graves to bring spiritual peace to the departed. It has been used in unguents and perfumes since records are known.
Botanical Name: Origanum majorana
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Dried flowering herb
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Warm, herbaceous, nutty, and woody
Largest Producing Countries: Hungary and Egypt
Traditional Use: Used as fragrance components in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes. Employed in most major food categories, especially meats, seasonings and sauces, as well as soft drinks and alcoholic beverages.
Properties: Analgesic, anti-aphrodisiac, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, antiviral, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cephalic, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic (mild), emmenagogue, expectorant, hypotenser, laxative, nervine, sedative, tonic, vasodilator, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Amenorrhea, anxiety, bronchitis, bruises, chilblains, colds, constipation, coughs, dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, epileptic seizures, flatulence, grief, headache, head congestion, hypertension, hysteria, insomnia, leucorrhea, lumbago, muscular aches and stiffness, neurasthenia, PMT, sore throats, strains, ticks, and vertigo.
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, black pepper, cedarwood, roman chamomile, cypress, eucalyptus citriodora, eucalyptus radiata, fennel, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, mandarin, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, pine, rosemary, tea tree, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Melissa

melissa 039 Melissa essential oil                           $452/oz.
Bulgaria; Eco-Ethical

The word 'Melissa' is Greek for 'Honey Bee', Melissa having been planted near bee hives to produce the most delicious honey. Melissa (or Lemon Balm) oil is considered one of the most powerfully medicinal essential oils in all of aromatherapy, with a wonderfully pleasant sweet, herbaceous aroma.
A great deal of oil sold as Melissa today is actually a blend including lemongrass and citronella oils - 'true' Melissa oil has its own unique aroma and properties. Melissa's high cost is a result of needing around 11,000 lbs. of plant material to produce 1 pound of essential oil. The resulting oil from this sweet-smelling herb is a pale yellow liquid with a light, fresh lemony aroma. Melissa oil offered at exceptionally low prices is likely to be adulterated in some way, and will not have the medicinal properties of the true essential oil.
Melissa was one of the earliest medicinal herbs. Paracelsus called Melissa the 'elixir of life'. The herb was associated particularly with nervous disorders, the heart, and emotions. Melissa was used for anxiety, melancholy, and to strengthen and revive the vital spirit.
In Advanced Aromatherapy, Kurt Schnaubelt wrote "The way in which melissa oil combines an excellent antiviral component with a soothing but pervasive sedative power is difficult to imagine; it has to be experienced. In its complexity, power, and gentleness, melissa oil perfectly illustrates how nature time after time works better than one-dimensional synthetic medicines."
Melissa is a strong antiviral – and at the same time, Melissa is very gentle on the emotions, and can bring out this quality in a individual. Melissa oil is calming and uplifting, may relieve headaches, and may help balance the emotions. It may help release emotional blocks and lead to an improved outlook on life.
Botanical Name: Melissa officinalis
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled; How to best harvest and prepare lemon balm, 9/17/11
Parts Used: Flowering tops and leaves
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Citrus, light, fresh
Largest Producing Countries: U.S., Hungary, Egypt, and Italy
Traditional Use: Used extensively as a fragrance component in toiletries, cosmetics, and perfumes.
Properties: Antibiotic, antidepressant, antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cordial, diaphoretic, digestive, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hypnotic, hypotensive, nervine, sedative, stimulant, stomachic, sudoforic, tonic, uterine, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Allergies, amenorrhea, anxiety, asthma, bronchitis, calming, chronic coughs, colds, colic, depression, dysentery, eczema, fever, general tonic, headache, herpes, hypertension, hysteria, indigestion, infertility, insomnia, insect bites, intellectual fatigue, irritability, menstrual pain, migraine, nausea, nervous tension, palpitations, shock, sterility (women), stomach cramps, stress, vertigo, and vomiting.
Recipe: For herpes outbreaks, try 1 part Geranium Oil, 1 part Melissa Oil, 1 part Lavender Oil, 10 parts Tea Tree Oil - apply to affected area undiluted 3 times a day; once skin dries and tightens, add mixture to 9 parts Almond Oil.
Blends Well With: Chamomile roman, frankincense, geranium, lavender, neroli, petitgrain, rose, and citrus oils.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, possible sensitization and dermal irritation; use in low dilutions only. Avoid in pregnancy.

*********************************************************************

Myrrh

myrrh 041 Myrrh essential oil                     $74/oz.
Kenya; Wild, Organic

Myrrh essential oil (Commiphora myrrha) is produced from resin extracted from the Myrrh tree (or shrub) found in the Middle East. The trunk of the Myrrh tree yields a natural oleoresin when pierced, and the pale yellow liquid hardens into reddish-brown drops known as Myrrh (the tree remains healthy after harvest). The oil is a pale yellow/amber oily liquid with a warm, sweet-balsamic, slightly spicy-medicinal scent.
As an ancient 'esoteric' magical herb, Myrrh is said to bridge Heaven and Earth, strengthening the connection between our crown and base chakras. This may allow the manifestation of dreams into this earthly realm. As a 'Funeral' herb, Myrrh is said to ease grief and heal emotional wounds, bringing peace and calm. It's extraction from the solitary tree in the desert represents strength in harsh conditions. Not only was myrrh present at the birth of Christ – as one of the Magi’s three gifts – but at his death as well. Myrrh is thought to have been one of the materials used by the Queen of Sheba in her seduction of King Solomon.
Myrrh's first medicinal use was documented some 3700 years ago. Myrrh essential oil is highly prized for it's healing and spiritual powers; the oil has one of the highest sesquiterpene contents - a compound which can directly affect the hypothalamus, pituitary and amygdaline. Myrrh oil alone, or in combination with sandalwood and frankincense can be used to anoint the 'third eye' as a meditation or yoga aid. The aroma of Myrrh essential can be uplifting and assist in spiritual opening - like frankincense oil, myrrh's effect on the central nervous system is a gentle and calming one, able to instill a deep tranquility of the mind.
Botanical Name: Commiphora myrrha
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Gum resin
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Hot, smoky, herbaceous, woody, dry
Largest Producing Countries: Somalia, Yemen, Ethiopia and Kenya
Traditional Use: Used in pharmaceutical products, including mouthwashes, gargles, and toothpaste; also used in dentistry. Extensively used as fixatives and fragrance components in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes, especially oriental types and heavy florals.
Properties: Anticatarrhal, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, balsamic, carminative, cicatrisant, emmenagogue, expectorant, fungicidal, pectoral, sedative, stimulant (especially pulmonary), stomachic, tonic, uterine, and vulnerary.
Benefits: Amenorrhea, arthritis, asthma, athlete’s foot, bronchitis, calms sexual excitement, catarrh, chlorosis, colds, cough, cracked heels, cuts, diarrhea, dysentery, dyspepsia, eczema, flatulence, gingivitis, gum infections, hemorrhoids, hyperthyroid, laryngitis, leucorrhea, loss of appetite, mouth ulcers, pruritis, pyorrhea, ringworm, sore throat, stomatitis, thrush, treats uterine disorders, tuberculosis, ulcers, voice loss, wasting degenerative disease, wounds, and wrinkles. Myrrh can have a positive effect on the whole body, 12/22/13; Turmeric and myrhh protect against lead toxicity, 1/8/14; Health benefits of frankincense and myrrh, 2/17/15
Blends Well With: Bergamot, chamomile roman, clove, cypress, eucalyptus citriodora, eucalyptus radiata, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, mimosa, neroli, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, tea tree, vetiver, ylang ylang and all spice oils.
Recipe: For mouth sores, try 10 drops myrrh oil, 10 drops of tea tree oil, 10 drops of peppermint oil; add 8 drops of this blend to 4 ounces of warm water and rinse mouth 3 times a day.
Safety Data: Non-irritant, non-sensitizing, possibly toxic in high concentration. Its use while pregnant is not recommended. Not for internal use.

*********************************************************************

Neroli

neroli 042 Neroli essential oil                                  $425/oz.
Tunisia; Select Farmed

In common with rose and jasmine, neroli oil, Citrus aurantium amara, is a very precious oil and almost a complete fragrance in itself. It forms the heart (along with bergamot, lavender, lemon, petitgrain and rosemary) of one of the world’s most enduring perfumes, ‘Eau de Cologne’.
Named for a 17th century Italian princess (Anna Maria, Princess of Nerola, near Rome) who wore the flower as a perfume, the prostitutes of Madrid also employed Neroli as a scent, so they would be recognized by its aroma. The blossoms are worn as a bridal headdress and carried as a bouquet, symbolizing purity and virginity.
Although neroli oil is produced in many countries, especially around the Mediteranean area, the oils produced in France and Tunisia have always been considered to be the very finest and still command the highest price.
Unlike much of its French counterpart, Tunisian bitter orange trees are not subjected to agrochemicals and much of the neroli essential oil exported from Tunisia is produced from the blossoms of trees grown by small growing co-operatives and families, rather than from large-scale cultivation farms.
The essential oil is both a sedative and overall tonic to the nervous system. It can be beneficial for most disorders of an emotional origin. The oil has been used to treat heart palpitations, relieve insomnia and reduce nervousness. Neroli's calming effect can be experienced by deeply inhaling the aroma, and rubbing a few drops on the solar plexus.
It takes 1,000 pounds of blossoms to make 1 pound of oil.
Botanical Name: Citrus aurantium
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Freshly picked flowers
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Light, sweet-floral fragrance, with a terpeny top note
Largest Producing Countries: Tunisia, Italy, Morocco, Egypt, USA, and France
Traditional Use: Is used in eau-de-cologne and toilet waters (traditionally with lavender, lemon, rosemary, and bergamot).
Properties: Antibiotic, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, deodorant, digestive, fungicidal, hypnotic (mild), neurotonic, sedative, stimulant (nervous), and tonic.
Benefits: Anxiety, birthing, colic, convalescence, diarrhea (chronic), fatigue, flatulence, hemorrhoids, hysteria, insomnia, intestinal spasm, mature and sensitive skin, nervous depression, nervous dyspepsia, nervous skin rashes, nervous tension, oily and dry skin, palpitations, PMS, PMT, poor circulation, scars, shock, skin care, stretch marks, thread veins, tuberculosis, uplifting, and wrinkles.
Blends Well With: Benzoin, German and Roman chamomile, clary sage, coriander, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, mandarin, myrrh, orange, palmarosa, petitgrain, rose, sandalwood and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing, and non-photo toxic.

*********************************************************************

Nutmeg, Extra

nutmeg-seed 044 Nutmeg, Extra essential oil       $16/oz.
Indonesia; Organic

Botanical Name: Myristica fragrans
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Seed
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Spicy, warm, and nutty
Largest Producing Countries: Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and Grenada
Traditional Use: Used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals, especially analgesic and tonic preparations. It is also used in soaps, lotions, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes.
Properties: Analgesic, antioxidant, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, emmenagogue, larvicidal, neurotonic, stimulant, and tonic.
Benefits: Arthritis, bacterial infection, diarrhea, flatulence, frigidity, gout, impotence, indigestion, muscular aches and pains, nausea, nervous fatigue, neuralgia, poor circulation, rheumatism, and sluggish digestion. Many think that inhaling the fragrance of nutmeg is said to open the conscious mind to attract financial prosperity.
Blends Well With: Bay, black pepper, clary sage, coriander, eucalyptus, geranium, ginger, lavandin, lime, mandarin, oakmoss, orange, peru balsam, petitgrain, rosemary, ylang ylang and most spice oils.
Safety Data: Generally non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. However, used in large doses they show signs of toxicity such as nausea, stupor and tachycardia, believed to be due to the myristicin content. Use extreme caution when administering internally. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Orange

orange 045 Orange essential oil                                           $11/oz.
Organic

Botanical Name: Citrus sinensis
Common Method Of Extraction: Cold pressed
Parts Used: Outer peel
Note Classification: Top
Aroma: Sweet, sugary, and citrus
Largest Producing Countries: Dominican Republic, Israel, Cyprus, Brazil, and USA
Traditional Use: Extensively used as a fragrance component in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, perfumes, and in the food and drinks industry.
Properties: Antibiotic, anticoagulant, antidepressant, antigenic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cholagogue, choleretic, depurative, digestive, diuretic, fungicidal, humectant, hypotensive, sedative (nervous), stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), stomachic, and tonic.
Benefits: Anxiety, bronchitis, chills, colds, constipation, dull and oily skin conditions, dyspepsia, flu, helps eliminate toxins, intestinal gas, mouth ulcers, nervous obesity, palpitations, spasm, tension and stress, and water retention. See: ORANGE ~ Therapeutic Essential Oil As an Adjunct Cancer Therapy, 4/11/10; Orange & Lemon Essential Oils Anti-Cancer Effects; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; Need a lift? Check out the many uses of orange oil, 10/12/13;
Blends Well With: Bay, bergamot, black pepper, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, coriander, eucalyptus citriodora, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, litsea cubeba, marjoram, myrrh, neroli, nutmeg, patchouli, petitgrain, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Generally non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing, although caution must be used when applying it to the skin.

*********************************************************************

Oregano

oregano 046 Oregano essential oil                                $29/oz.
Turkey; Wild

Botanical Name: Origanum minutiflorum
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Dried flowering herb
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Warm, spicy-herbaceous, and camphoraceous
Largest Producing Countries: USA, Bulgaria, Turkey, Spain and Italy
Traditional Use: Used as a fragrance component in soaps, colognes and perfumes, especially men’s fragrances.
Properties: Analgesic, anthelminthic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, antiviral, bactericidal, carminative, choleretic, cytophylactic, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, fungicidal, parasiticide, rubefacient, stimulant, and tonic. One of the strongest antibacterial essential oils.
Benefits: If used on the skin it should be extremely diluted. Arthritis, bronchitis, colds, flu, general debility, infections, muscular pain, respiratory infection, and rheumatism. Oil of Oregano: A Powerhouse for the Alternative Medicine Cabinet, 11/3/8; Oregano oil eliminates parasites in humans, 10/27/9; Oregano Oil Health Benefits, 12/7/9; Kill candida overgrowth with these nine powerful herbs, 8/30/11; Discover a natural potent anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal, 9/1/11; Did you know? Oregano delivers more antioxidants than blueberries, oranges or apples, 2/7/12; Using Oregano Oil for Common Problems, 6/27/12; Lung Cleansing Benefits of Oregano, 10/30/12; Chicken farmer uses oregano oil, cinnamon in place of antibiotics, 1/8/13; Oregano keeps chickens healthy and disease-free naturally, 1/15/13; Five unbeatable essential oils to help stop chronic digestive distress, 7/14/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; Why oil of oregano is a must-have for any survivalist, 'prepper', 12/9/13; Woman heals her psoriasis with infection-fighting properties of wild oregano oil, 2/20/14; Oregano oil inhibits cancer growth, breaks down norovirus and removes warts, 7/14/14; How to kill candida and balance your intestinal flora, 9/5/14; No more toxic fungicide: Oregano essential oil protects corn crops from fungal infections, 12/18/14; No more toxic fungicide: Oregano essential oil protects corn crops from fungal infections, 1/4/15
Blends Well With: Bay, bergamot, camphor, cedarwood, chamomile roman, citronella, cypress, eucalyptus (all), lavandin, lavender, lemon, lime, litsea cubeba, mandarin, oakmoss, orange, petitgrain, pine, rosemary, spike lavender, tea tree, thyme linalol, and thyme red.
Safety Data: Dermal toxin, skin irritant, mucous membrane irritant. Avoid during pregnancy and not to be used on children under 18. Do not use in baths.

*********************************************************************

Palmarosa

palmarosa 047 Palmarosa essential oil                       $11/oz.
India; Wildcrafted

Palmarosa oil (Cymbopogon martinii) has been distilled since the 18th century. Featured in the Indian Materia Medica, the oil and the dried herb are both used in Ayurvedic medicine.
Botanical Name: Cymbopogon martinii
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Leaves, stalks, and flower heads
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Sweet, floral, rosy, geranium-like
Largest Producing Countries: Nepal, India, and Pakistan
Traditional Use: Used extensively as a fragrance component in cosmetics, perfumes, and especially soaps due to excellent tenacity. Used for the isolation of natural geraniol.
Properties: Antibacterial, antibiotic, antifungal, anti-infectious, antiseptic, antiviral, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, digestive, emollient, febrifuge, nervine, stimulant (digestive, circulatory), tonic (heart), and vermifuge.
Benefits: Acne, anorexia, athlete’s foot and other fungal infections, bronchitis, convalescence, cryptococcus, dermatitis, digestive atonia, eczema, general fatigue, intestinal infections, mature skin, nervous exhaustion and stress related conditions, regeneration of the skin, regulates oil production of the skin, scar tissue, skin infections, tissue regeneration, uterine tonic, vaginal infections, and wrinkles.
Blends Well With: Amyris, bay, bergamot, cananga, cedarwood, roman chamomile, citronella, clary sage, clove, coriander, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, guaiacwood, juniper, lavender, lemon, lemongrass, lime, mandarin, neroli, oakmoss, orange, patchouli, petitgrain, rose, rosemary, rosewood, sandalwood, and ylang ylang.

*********************************************************************

Parsley Seed

parsley 048 Parsley Seed essential oil             $29/oz.
Botanical Name: Petroselinum sativum
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Seed
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Warm, wood-spicy herbaceous
Largest Producing Countries: Hungary, France, Germany, and the Netherlands
Traditional Use: Used in some carminative and digestive remedies, such as ‘gripe waters’. It is used in soaps, detergents, colognes, cosmetics and perfumes, especially men’s fragrances. It is also found in meats, pickles, and sauces.
Properties: Antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, depurative, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hypotensive, laxative, stimulant (mild), stomachic, and tonic (uterine).
Benefits: Accumulation of toxins, aids in child birthing, amenorrhea, arthritis, broken blood vessels, cellulite, colic, cystitis, dysmenorrhea, flatulence, hemorrhoids, indigestion, rheumatism, sciatica, and urinary infection.
Blends Well With: Cananga, clary sage, neroli, oakmoss, rose, tea tree, and spice oils.
Safety Data: Moderately toxic and irritating to some individuals, otherwise non-sensitizing. Use in moderation and avoid during pregnancy. Not for internal use.

*********************************************************************

Peppermint

peppermint 051 Peppermint essential oil                 $22/oz.
France; Organic

Peppermint oil (Mentha piperita) is considered by aromatherapists as one of the more indispensable essential oils, standard in one’s first aid kit.
It is known as one of the seven polyvalents (effective against many toxins), which are applicable to many ailments. According to Greek mythology the genus Mentha takes its name from the nymph Minthe who was seduced by Pluto and turned into a plant by his jealous wife, who trod Minthe into the ground. Pluto, however, turned her into an herb, knowing people would then appreciate Minthe for years to come.
Traditionally classified as a Visionary Herb, mint was thought not only to uplift the Spirit, but also to bring dreams of prophecy. Mint was dedicated to the Ancient Greeks to Zeus, the king of the gods.
Botanical Name: Mentha piperita
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Flowering herb
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Fresh, very minty, hot, herbaceous, with a vegetative back note
Largest Producing Countries: USA, Africa, and Egypt
Traditional Use: Flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals, and ingredient in cough, cold and digestive remedies. Is also used as a flavoring agent in many foods, especially chewing gum and confectionery, alcoholic and soft drinks; also tobacco. Fragrance components in soaps, toothpaste, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes.
Properties: Analgesic, anesthetic (mild), antibiotic, antidepressant, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antiphlogistic, antipruritic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant for the prostate (mild), depurative, digestive, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, sedative, stimulant (particularly to the heart, brain, and pancreas), stomachic, sudorific, tonic (nerve), vasoconstrictor, vermifuge, and viricide.
Benefits: Acne, asthma, belching, bronchitis, cholera, clears the sinuses, colds, cough, cramps, dermatitis, diarrhea, dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, eczema, fainting, fevers, flatulence, flu, gaseous indigestion and irritated colon, gastralgia, halitosis, headaches, hysteria, insect bites, insufficient liver or pancreas juices, kidney stones and gallstones, mental fatigue, migraine, motion sickness, mouth or gum infections, muscular pain, nausea, nerve pain, nervous disorders, neuralgia, palpitations, paralysis, poor circulation, pruritis, purulent (itching, stinking), respiratory disorders, ringworm, scabies, sciatica, shock, sinusitis, toothache, travel sickness, tuberculosis, vertigo, and vomiting.
Lung Cleansing With Peppermint Oil, 10/11/12; Peppermint aroma improves memory and concentration, 12/10/11; Ward off cancer, protect against radiation, and ease irritable bowel syndrome with mint, 7/11/12; Six ways to maximize the healing powers of peppermint, 4/9/13; Five unbeatable essential oils to help stop chronic digestive distress, 7/14/13; Use peppermint oil to aid digestion, repel bugs, and more, 9/26/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; Peppermint provides surprising results for digestive problems, physical performance and even weight loss, 12/22/13; 20 practical uses for this cheap and versatile survival staple, 1/25/14; Four surprising uses for peppermint oil, 3/5/14
Blends Well With: Basil, benzoin, black pepper, cedarwood, cypress, eucalyptus (all), geranium, grapefruit, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, marjoram, niaouli, pine, ravensara, rosemary, thyme, tea tree, and other mints.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant (except in concentration), possible sensitization due to menthol. Use in moderation. Not recommended for us while pregnant.

*********************************************************************

Rose Otto

112814x 081513e rose 053 Rose Otto essential oil $803/oz.
Bulgaria; Select Farmed

Rose Otto (Rosa damascena) is the queen of roses, the queen of flowers and the queen of all essential oils. Its fragrant blooms have long been prized as a symbol of love and beauty and it holds a special place in the hearts of all who love aromatherapy and natural perfumery. There is quite simply, no other essential oil quite like it in terms of fragrance and wealth of therapeutic healing benefits. Even with her prohibitive price and the advent of organic synthesis, rose otto is still the most widely used essential oil in perfumery.
Of the very few of the world’s 7,000 rose varieties that produce oils, the Bulgarian Damask Rose, cultivated for over 300 years, is considered to be the most desirable. It is the predominant anointing oil used in the coronation ceremony of British monarchs.
Thought to originate in Damascus, Rosa damascena, was brought to Southern France in the 14th century by knights returning from the Crusades. Various strains of roses, including damask rose, were cultivated and used in the ancient Greek, Roman, Asian, Egyptian, and Arab worlds. It is mentioned by Homer in the Iliad. Avicenna, a Persian physician, was the first to produce rose water in the 1st century CE. In 77 CE, Pliny the Elder recorded 32 different beneficial effects of rose preparations. Damask rose preparations are used in Ayurveda, ancient and traditional Indian medicine, for soothing various complaints.
The origin of the cultivated rose is believed to be the Gulf of Persia (now Iran) in the 10th through 17th centuries. The first known rose oil distilleries existed in the year 1612 in Shiraz, the famous city of poets and oriental culture. From here the rose industry spread into Arabia, Mesopotamia, Palestine, Asia Minor (Anatolia) Greece, India, North Africa, and due to the conquering Moors reached as far as Spain.
To this day, of all the places in the world where roses are cultivated, there are just a handful of regions in two countries (Bulgaria & Turkey) that provide just the right conditions to grow this incredible flower in large enough quantities to produce rose otto essential oil on a large scale. Unique climactic and soil conditions make Bulgaria’s Valley of the Roses the finest rose oil producing region in the world. It is also known as the Kazanlik Valley. Kazan is the Turkish word for 'still', and Kazanlik literally means 'the place of stills'. The air humidity, cloudiness and precipitation in May and June here contribute to the cultivation of roses that do not over produce wax for protection from the rays of the sun, thus yielding the highest percentage of oil.
The harvesting season starts as soon as the flowers begin to open and continues until all the roses have been gathered. In Bulgaria the blossoms are still collected by hand and are nipped just below the calyx (the green, outer protective cover). Collection begins at sunrise when the oil yield is at its highest, and is completed by 10am whilst the dew is still on the flowers. The flowers are initially placed into baskets, and then transferred to sacks for transportation via horse drawn carriages or the backs of donkeys to the distilleries.
drawn carriages or the backs of donkeys to the distilleries.

It takes about 4,000 pounds of flowers to make 1 pound of rose oil; that’s approximately 60,000 roses to produce just 1 oz of Rose Oil (Rose Otto) or about 2-1/2 dozen roses to make just one drop.
NOTE: Distilled Rose Otto at it's undiluted, 100% strength naturally crystallizes and congeals, in fact these characteristics are indications of quality in the distilled product. It liquifies readily with warmth of hands or warmer room temperatures.
Botanical Name: Rosa damascena
Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Fresh petals
Note Classification: Middle to top
Aroma: Very rich, deep, sweet-floral, slightly spicy; penetrating and long lasting
Largest Producing Countries: Bulgaria, Turkey, France, India, and Russia
Traditional Use: Employed extensively in soaps, cosmetics, toiletries, and perfumes of all types.
Properties: Antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antitubercular agent, antiviral, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, choleretic, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, depurative, emmenagogue, emollient, hemostatic, hepatic, laxative, pectoral, regulator of appetite, sedative (nervous), stomachic, and tonic (heart, liver, stomach, uterus).
Benefits: Amenorrhea, aphrodisiac, asthma, broken capillaries, childbirth, cholecystitis, coughs, depression, dry skin, eczema, emotional crisis, general tonic, frigidity, hay fever, headache, herpes, impotence, infertility, insomnia, leucorrhea, liver congestion, mature and sensitive complexions, menorrhagia, nausea, nervous tension and stress-related complaints, palpitations, poor circulation, scarring, skin problems, uterine disorders, and wrinkles.
Top five essential oils for stress relief and how to properly use them, 5/23/13; Discover how to fortify yourself against cancer, inflammation, depression and more with this one aromatic flower, 8/15/13
Blends Well With: It blends well with most oils and is useful for ‘rounding off’ blends. Particularly, it works well with bergamot, chamomile roman, clary sage, geranium, jasmine, lavender, lemon, mandarin, melissa, neroli, patchouli, petitgrain, rosewood, sandalwood, ylang ylang, and vetiver.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. There are rare reports of allergy or dermatitis in hypersensitive individuals. Its use while pregnant is not recommended.

*********************************************************************

Rosemary

054 Rosemary essential oil
Rosemary oil can be used as a natural meat preservative, and it works better than chemical additives, 1/5/12; Shakespeare was right: rosemary oil boosts memory, 4/9/13; Rosemary's aroma may enhance memory and health, 5/5/13; Rosemary is linked to enhanced brain performance and other health benefits, 7/9/13; Smelling lavender and rosemary essential oils stimulates free radical scavenging activity, protecting cells, 8/19/13; How rosemary essential oil could help improve your brain and heart health, 3/1/16

*********************************************************************

Rosewood

rosewood 055 Rosewood essential oil                        $22/oz.
Brasil; Wildcrafted

Botanical Name: Aniba roseodora
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Wood chips
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Very sweet, woody-floral, with a hint of spice
Largest Producing Countries: Brazil and Peru
Traditional Use: Once used extensively as a source of natural linalol, now increasingly replaced by the synthetic from. Used extensively in perfumery work, soaps, toiletries, cosmetics, and perfumes.
Properties: Analgesic (mild), antibacterial, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, antifungal, anti-infectious, anti-microbial, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, cephalic, deodorant, stimulant (immune system), and tonic.
Benefits: Acne, colds, coughs, dermatitis, fever, frigidity, headaches, infections, nausea, nervous tension and stress-related conditions, respiratory infections, scars, skin (sensitive, dry, dull, combination oily/dry), stimulates the immune system, vaginal candida, wounds, and wrinkles.
Blends Well With: Blends well with most oils, especially citrus, woods, and florals. It helps give body and rounds off sharp edges.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing.

*********************************************************************

Sandalwood Tamil Nadu

081513e sandalwood 057 Sandalwood Tamil Nadu essential oil $254/oz.
Sri Lanka; Wildcrafted

Sandalwood (Santalum album) has been coveted in India and Asia since the dawn of history. It is mentioned in the oldest scriptures and the Vedas, which date back many thousands of years. The heartwood of this tree is sought after for its marvelous, cedar-like scent. Even after cutting, the wood will exude this pleasant odor for up to 60 years. In fact, sandalwood oil distilled from the wood and seeds is used for cosmetics, medicines, perfumes and lubricants. Ancient civilizations considered sandalwood a valuable commodity, along with gold, silver, amber and ivory.
Explorers such as Marco Poco returned to their homelands with fabulous tales of sandalwood, teak, spices and jewels. So great was the demand for this valuable wood, especially for people of great wealth and royalty, that King Solomon himself was a major factor in the extermination of Lebanon's sandalwood forests centuries ago. In fact, there are no untouched sandalwood forest left in the world today.
The divinely sweet aroma, a softly balsamic base-note, evokes the Earth element at its most sensual yet deeply tranquil. Sandalwood Tamil Nadu is a very smooth sandalwood, best used for its therapeutic, rather than strictly aromatic properties.
Sandalwood retains an important place in Ayurvedic, Tibetan, and traditional Chinese medicines. The oil is high in sesquiterpenes, a class of compound which has been studied in Europe for its stimulating of the pineal gland and the limbic region of the brain - the center of our emotions. Clarifying and stilling to the mind, and refreshing to an overheated body, Sandalwood is thought to reconnect one to the primordial state of being, diminishing the need to 'overthink'. Sandalwood can instill a sense of inner unity, helping re-establish an acceptance of reality as it is. Yogis believe it encourages a meditative state and enhances devotion to God.
Botanical Name: Santalum album
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Roots and heartwood, powdered and dried
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Deep, soft, sweet-woody balsamic
Largest Producing Countries: India
Traditional Use: Extensively employed as a fragrance component and fixative in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes – especially oriental, woody, aftershaves, and chypres.
Properties: Antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiphlogistic, antiseptic (urinary and pulmonary), antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, calmative, carminative, cicatrisant, decongestant (lymph and veinous system), diuretic, emollient, expectorant, fungicidal, insecticidal, sedative, and tonic (heart).
Benefits: Acne, anxiety, aphrodisiac, bladder infections, blenorrhea, bronchitis, cardiac fatigue, catarrh, chest infections, cough, cracked and chapped skin, cystitis, depression, diarrhea, dry skin, fluid retention, gonorrhea, hiccough, impotence, insomnia, laryngitis, nausea, nervous tension, pelvic congestion, scarring, sore throat, strep and staph infections, stress, tuberculosis, and vomiting; Try sandalwood oil for dry skin and hair, 7/8/11; Your skin 'smells' sandalwood essential oil, which stimulates cell proliferation and wound healing, 7/12/14; Human Skin Contains An Odor Receptor That Responds To Sandalwood Smells By Enhanced Healing, 10/25/14
Blends Well With: Basil, bergamot, black pepper, cassie, chamomile roman, clary sage, clove, costus, eucalyptus, geranium, grapefruit, fennel, frankincense, jasmine, labdanum, lavender, lemon, mandarin, mimosa, myrrh, neroli, oakmoss, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, peppermint, rose, rosewood, tuberose, vetiver, violet, and ylang ylang.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing.

*********************************************************************

Savory Montana

savory058 Savory Montana essential oil $33/oz.
France

Botanical Name: Satureja montana
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Whole herb
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Sharp, medicinal, herbaceous
Largest Producing Countries: Albania , Spain , and France
Traditional Use: Occasionally used in perfumery work. Employed to some extent in flavoring, mainly meats and seasonings.
Properties: Anticatarrhal, antiputrescent, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrizant, emmenagogue, expectorant, fungicidal, stimulant, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Should not be used on the skin at all.
Blends Well With: Lavandin, lavender, oakmoss, pine, rosemary, and citrus oils.
Safety Data: Dermal toxin, dermal irritant, and mucous membrane irritant. Avoid during pregnancy.

*********************************************************************

Tea Tree

tea-tree 062 Tea Tree essential oil                         $11/oz.
Organic

Because the water-resistant “paperbark” is so easy to peel off the tree, Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) was used extensively by the aboriginal peoples of Australia to make small canoes, knife sheaths, and thatching for shelters. When cut down, the Tea Tree will quickly regrow from the stump. The aborigines soaked the pungent leaves in hot water and taken them as a cure for cold coughs, and headaches – or they were simply picked from the tree and chewed. It was Captain Cook who called the plant Tea Tree and it was a valued bush remedy used by early European settlers.
In World War II cutters and producers of tea tree were exempt from military service until enough essential oil had been accumulated. It was issued to each soldier and sailor for them to treat tropical infections and other problems of warfare, including wounds.
Botanical Name: Melaleuca alternifolia
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Leaves and twigs
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Warm, Fresh, spicy-camphoraceous
Largest Producing Countries: Australia
Traditional Use: Employed in soaps, toothpastes, deodorants, disinfectants, gargles, germicides, and increasingly, in aftershaves and spicy colognes.
Properties: Analgesic, antibacterial, antibiotic, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiparasitic, antiseptic, antiviral, balsamic, cicatrisant, decongestant, diaphoretic, expectorant, fungicidal, stimulant (immune), and vulnerary. In 1923 an Australian scientist, Dr. A. R. Penfold, conducted a study of tea tree essential oil and discovered it to be 12 times more potent as an antiseptic bactericide than carbolic acid (the standard at the time). Tea Tree oil became recognized, according to the British Medical Journal in 1933, as 'a powerful disinfectant, non-poisonous and non-irritating'.
022714h Benefits: Abscess, acne, asthma, athlete’s foot, blisters, bronchitis, burns, candida, catarrh, chicken pox, cold sores, colds, coughs, cystitis, dandruff, ear and nose infections, fever, flu, fungal infections, herpes, immune system deficiencies, infectious illnesses, insect bites, local anesthetic, oily skin, prevents radiation burns or scalds, pruritis, respiratory problems, sinusitis, skin rashes, staph, strep throat, thrush, tooth and gum infections, tuberculosis, vaginal infections, veruccae, viral infections, warts, whooping cough, and wounds. See: 112 Tea Tree Oil Uses That Just Might Surprise You; Discover the wonders of tea tree oil, 7/21/11; Use essential oils to treat and heal acne, 9/2/11; Potent Survival Medicine in a Little Bottle, 5/21/13; Tea tree oil can work wonders for your skin, 8/31/13; Tea tree oil is a mini medicine cabinet in a bottle, 10/12/13; Love yourself and love your body - Treatments with tea tree oil, 11/6/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13
Blends Well With: Tea Tree essential oil has a fresh, sharp scent, and is not usually blended with other oils, however it can blend with basil, bergamot, black pepper, cananga, german chamomile, roman chamomile, clary sage, clove, cypress, eucalyptus globus, eucalyptus radiata, geranium, juniper, lavandin, lavender, lemon, marjoram, nutmeg, oakmoss, oregano, peppermint, pine, ravensara, rosemary, thyme linalol, and thyme red.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, with possible sensitization in some individuals. Not to be used internally.

*********************************************************************

Red Thyme

red-thyme 063 Red Thyme essential oil                       $29/oz.
France; Wildcrafted

Botanical Name: Thymus zygis
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Fresh or partially dried leaves
Note Classification: Middle
Aroma: Warm, spicy-herbaceous, powerful
Largest Producing Countries: Spain and France
Traditional Use: The oil is used in mouthwashes, gargles, toothpastes and cough lozenges.
Properties: Analgesic, anthelminthic, antifungal, anti-infectious, antimicrobial, anti-oxidant, antiputrescent, antirheumatic, antiseptic, (intestinal, pulmonary, genito-urinary), antispasmodic, antitussive, antitoxic, antivenomus, antiviral, aperitif, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, balsamic, carminative, cicatrizant, diuretic, emmenagogue, nervine, parasiticide, pectoral, revulsive, rubefacient, stimulant (immune system, circulation), sudorific, tonic, and vermifuge.
Benefits: Abscess, acne, anorexia, arthritis, asthma, balsamic, bronchitis, bruises, burns, catarrh, cellulitis, chills, colds, coughs, cuts, cystitis, dermatitis, diarrhea, dyspepsia, eczema, edema, expectorant, flatulence, flu, gout, gum infections, headaches, infectious diseases, insect bites, insomnia, gum infections, laryngitis, lice, muscular aches and pains, nervous debility and stress related conditions, obesity, oily skin, poor circulation, rheumatism, scabies, sinusitis, sore throat, sports injuries, sprains, thrush, tonsillitis, urethritis, verrucas, and warts.
Blends Well With: Bergamot, clary sage, cypress, eucalyptus (all), geranium, grapefruit, lavandin, lavender, lemon, marjoram, melissa, Peru balsam, pine, rosemary, and tea tree.
Safety Data: Do not use while pregnant or on children. Can be a mucous membrane and skin irritant.
See: Basil & Thyme Essential Oils Combat Foodborne Bacteria

*********************************************************************

Turmeric

turmeric 064 Turmeric essential oil                        $29/oz.
Botanical Name: Curcuma longa
Common Method Of Extraction: Solvent extracted
Parts Used: ‘Cured” rhizome – boiled, cleaned and sun-dried
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Fresh, spicy-woody
Largest Producing Countries: India, China, and Japan
Traditional Use: Employed in perfumery work, for oriental and fantasy-type fragrances.
Properties: Analgesic, anti-arthritic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, bactericidal, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, hypotensive, insecticidal, laxative, rubefacient, and stimulant.
Benefits: Perfumery. Blends Well With: Cananga, cassie, clary sage, elecampane, ginger, labdanum, mimosa, and orris. 20 Health Benefits of Turmeric, 10/1/7; Fights Strokes; Spice drug fights stroke damage, 2/10/11; This Indian spice packs a powerful anti-cancer punch, 3/11/11; Turmeric spice can cure pancreatic cancer, 10/27/11; Turmeric and myrhh protect against lead toxicity, 1/8/14
Safety Data: The ketone ‘tumerone’ is moderately toxic and irritant in high concentration. Possible sensitization problems. Not for internal use.

*********************************************************************

Ylang Ylang

ylang-ylang 070 Ylang Ylang essential oil                 $38/oz.
Madagascar; Organic

Ylang ylang essential oil is distilled from a small tree (Cananga odorata) which grows in Indonesia, the Philippines, Madagascar and Reunion Islands. It means 'flowers of flowers' and you can find pink, mauve and yellow flowered varieties. The best oil comes from the yellow flowers, which are picked very early in the day, in early summer. The fragrant, pale yellow petals are often strewn across the marriage bed as a symbol of love.
This sweet, heavy, distinctive fragrance is used widely in perfumes and cosmetics. Ylang ylang oil's softer floral scent is often used in men's fragrances as an alternative to the sweeter and more feminine rose.
Like the three major aphrodisiac oils (rose, neroli and jasmine), ylang ylang is beautifully uplifting emotionally and relaxing. The calming effect of this oil may be the reason it is considered an aphrodisiac as using it would lessen tensions or anxieties. It can help balance male and female energies, reducing internal conflict between these seeming opposites. In this manner, the aroma of the oil may positively influence sexual relationships, and help restore confidence.
Botanical Name: Cananga odorata
Common Method Of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Freshly picked flowers
Note Classification: Base
Aroma: Intensely sweet, soft, floral-balsamic, slightly spicy scent, with a creamy rich top note
Largest Producing Countries: Comoro Islands, Madagascar, and Reunion
Traditional Use: Extensively used as a fragrance component and fixative in soaps, cosmetics, perfumes; ylang ylang extra tends to be used in high-class perfumes, ylang ylang 3 in soaps, detergents, etc.
Properties: Antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiseborrheic, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, calmative, euphoric, hypotensive, nervine, regulator, sedative (nervous), stimulant (circulatory), and tonic.
Benefits: Acne, circulation, depression, frigidity, hair growth, high blood pressure, hyperpnoea, hypertension, impotence, insect bites, insomnia, nervous tension, oily skin, palpitations, PMS, regulates cardiac and respiratory rhythms, tachycardia, and uterine tonic.
Blends Well With: most oils, including bergamot, cassie, chamomile roman, clary sage, clove, costus, eucalyptus citriodora, ginger, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, litsea cubeba, mandarin, mimosa, neroli, opopanax, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, Peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, rosewood, sandalwood, tuberose, vetiver, and yuzu.
Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant, a few cases of sensitization reported. Use in moderation, since its heady scent can cause headaches or nausea.


*********************************************************************
Aromatherapy: Aromatherapy helps smokers overcome nicotine addiction, 3/27/14


Essential Oil articles

021115r 081513e Essential Oil Use Chart; 100+ Uses for the Everday Oils; Guide To Aromatherapy And Essential Oils: Essential oils news, articles and information; Vibrational Frequency and the Subtle Energy Nature of Essential Oils; Green Valley Aromatherapy; Essential oils could replace chemical additives in preserving meat products, 10/11/6; Essential Oils Offer Many Health Benefits, 4/13/9; Use Essential Oils for a Natural Acne Remedy, 3/15/10; Make Natural, Harmless Deodorants with Essential Oils, 3/17/10; Essential Oils Contain Healing Properties, 6/12/10; Deter household pests the natural way, 3/1/11; Use essential oils for clean air blends and to prevent and treat colds, 5/3/11; Tips for choosing, buying and using essential oils, 5/13/11; Soothe back pain naturally with various essential oils, 7/2/11; Relieve aches and pains with essential oils, 7/15/11; Use precautions and safety when using essential oils, 8/29/11; Use essential oils to treat and heal acne, 9/2/11; Avoid artificial fragrances, 9/21/11; Topical Home Remedies the Easy Way, 8/5/12; Short-term aromatherapy with essential oils may prevent heart disease, 12/1/12; How to heal yourself physically and emotionally with essential oils, 2/21/13; Top five essential oils for stress relief and how to properly use them, 5/23/13; Five unbeatable essential oils to help stop chronic digestive distress, 7/14/13; 8 Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care, 9/12/13; 14 Really Essential Oils, 5/19/14; Edible film made from essential oils can protect foods better than plastic, 6/20/14; Essential oils are the perfect non-toxic bug repellant, 7/20/14; How to use essential oils properly and conditions they can remedy, 8/3/14; How corporations control your thoughts, moods and actions through smell, 12/8/14; How I replaced my prescription medications with diet and essential oils, 2/7/15; Absolute Best Essential Oils To Stockpile For Emergencies, 5/4/15; Essential oils for insomnia, 7/30/15; Conquer drug-resistant superbugs with natural essential oils and traditional medicine validated by science, 8/11/15; Healing the gut: Power of essential oils, 12/18/15; Beauty of aromatherapy and why it's been used for centuries, 12/25/15; How essential oils can replace overused antibiotics and stop drug-resistant superbugs, 2/19/16; How essential oils will revolutionize food preservation, naturally, 3/23/16; Essential oils - Optimizing your health naturally, 8/18/16; Use essential oils for bone aches and inflammation, 1/24/17; What Are Essential Oils? A Guide from Extraction to Uses, 4/11/17
Anti-Cancer Essential Oils: Cancer Home Remedies Chart for Essential Oils; Are Essential Oils a Cure for Cancer?, 8/19/9; Anticancer Attributes Offered By Essential Oils; Cancer Fighting Essential Oils; Cancer Curing Essential Oils; Essential Oil Can Help To Cure Cancer; Killer or carcinogen? The truth about essential oils as anti-cancer agents; Essential Oils As Cancer Treatments - Research Updates on Frankincense and Lemongrass Oils; Frankincense: Could it be a cure for cancer?; Frankincense Essential Oil is Useful To Cure Cancer; Frankincense & Cancer; Frankincense Oil and Cancer – A Quality Standard Approaches; Skin Cancer - Frankincense and Other Essential Oils; ORANGE ~ Therapeutic Essential Oil As an Adjunct Cancer Therapy, 4/11/10; Orange & Lemon Essential Oils Anti-Cancer Effects; Essential Oils Stop Cancer In Its Tracks, 7/19/15; Frankincense oil kills cancer cells while boosting the immune system, 7/27/16
Pets: Homemade Flea Treatment with Essential Oils
Purification: Purification Essential Oil

Better Health Channel: Aromatherapy Fact Sheet
Sherry L. Ackerman: Wildcrafting: Seeing the world as a garden, 5/18/11
Rachel Adams: Learn the Power of Aromatherapy^
Baser & Buchbauer: Handbook of Essential Oils
Peter Brodhead: Essential Oils & Aromatherapy^
Tony Burfield: Safety of Essential Oils
Crystalinks: Aromatherapy
Demetria Clark: Aromatherapy for Pregnancy and Labor
Lewis de Claremont: Ancient Book of Formulas^
Zsuzsana Davidson: Living with Epilepsy and Aromatic Oils
Shanti Dechen : What is Aromatherapy?
Eliza: Aromatherapy
Hillson: Gold, Frankincense & Myrrh, 9/88^
Fleur Hupston: Tips for choosing, buying and using essential oils, 5/13/11
Caroline Innes: All About Aromatherapy
Farida Irani: Ayurveda Aromatherapy
Julia Lawless: Encyclopaedia of Essential Oils
bottles Seth McLaughlin: Aromatherapy Basics
G.W. Septimus Piesse: Art of Perfumery, 1857
Nixon & McCaw: Compleat Distiller
Brian Skinness: Aromatherapy 101
LeRee Westover: Butterfly Miracles with Essential Oils
Zhiri & Baudoux: Chemotyped Essential Oils^
unknown: Carrier Oils; Massage Oil Recipes; Absolutes; How To Make Your Own Perfume; Magickal Use of Oils
3wisemenessentials essential oils catalog

*********************************************************************

General Guidelines for safe use of essential oils

Be an experienced and knowledgeable user of essential oils and research all oils thoroughly and/or consult with a skilled practitioner before any use.

Dilute all oils being used with a vegetable carrier oil. Skin test all essential oils before using topically. Each person's body is different, so apply oils to a small area first. The inside of the arm is good for this. The bottoms of the feet are two of the safest, most affective places to use essential oils. Discontinue use or dilute further with vegetable oil if there is discomfort or skin irritation.

Keep essential oils out of the reach of children. Treat them as you would any product with therapeutic uses. Take special precaution with babies, pregnant women and anyone and everyone with allergies, special conditions and needs.

Keep essential oils away from mucous membranes and the eye area and do not put into ears. Do not handle contact lenses or rub eyes with essential oils on fingers. Know also that many of the citrus oils and others may cause a rash or darker pigmentation if applied to skin exposed to direct sunlight or UV rays within 3 to 4 days of use.

Keep bottles of essential oils tightly closed and store them in a cool location away from light. If stored properly, essential oils will maintain their potency for many years.


membership
jewel_net
microchip,_rfid
money
navavidha_bhakti
nisargadatta
osho
police
prison
psychopathy_&_evil
questions_answers
radiation
ramana_maharshi
reality
sentience
sun
surveillance_technology
synchronicity,_déjà-vu
vigyan_bhairav_tantra
war_against_us
war_on_drugs
wars


silver_eagle

3wbridge

ganesh_gold

astrol2

free_bird
Having issues with banksters or police state agencies? Want solid asset & income protection  - freedom and security? Include ph# when you           Contact Us.

      Freedom Tools/
 Commercial Remedies

Become a Member
Birth Certificate
Commerce Teachers 2
Contract Control
Debt Strategies
IDP
Sovereignty disk
Tax Empowerment

spooky2-ghos

facing_eye